Ask me anything   Jeffery Tompkins | Indianapolis, In | Musician | Urban enthusiast | Public Policy major on hiatus | Fan of generally any IPA

"The student is put outside of society, on a campus. Furthermore, he is excluded while being transmitted a knowledge which is traditional in nature, obsolete, ‘academic’ and not directly tied to the needs and problems of today […] Young people from 18 to 25 are thus, as it were, neutralized by and for society, rendered safe, ineffective, socially and politically castrated. There is the first function of the university: to put students out of circulation."
Foucault, “Rituals of Exclusion” (1971 interview)

(Source: whentherewerebicycles, via rchtctrstdntblg)

— 3 days ago with 2224 notes
explore-blog:

Illustrator Hiller Goodspeed captures Tolstoy’s notion of “emotional infectiousness" as the defining characteristic of art.

explore-blog:

Illustrator Hiller Goodspeed captures Tolstoy’s notion of “emotional infectiousness" as the defining characteristic of art.

— 2 weeks ago with 977 notes

wetheurban:

PHOTOGRAPHY: Wet Cities by Christophe Jacrot

French photographer Christophe Jacrot takes us out on the streets when most of us prefer staying sheltered. He captures the raw, stunning souls of Paris, New York and other cities in a different way, with artistic purpose in magical yet in-climate weather conditions.  

Read More

— 2 weeks ago with 10836 notes
somnifik:

"This is how fragile your life is"

somnifik:

"This is how fragile your life is"

(via religiousexperience)

— 1 month ago with 21041 notes
good:








(Click-through for full infographic) 


After a recent Skype in the classroom session with TOMS founder Blake Mycoskie about the power of social entrepreneurship and philanthropy, a new conversation emerged.. The class decided to examine the worldviews of the central characters they’d been studying and identify what each protagonist was (or wasn’t thinking) about his/her social responsibility. 

good:

After a recent Skype in the classroom session with TOMS founder Blake Mycoskie about the power of social entrepreneurship and philanthropy, a new conversation emerged.. The class decided to examine the worldviews of the central characters they’d been studying and identify what each protagonist was (or wasn’t thinking) about his/her social responsibility. 
— 2 months ago with 60 notes
"Henceforth, my dear philosophers, let us be on guard against the old and dangerous myth that postulates ‘a pure, will - less, painless and timeless knowing subject’. Let us take care not to get caught in the tentacles of such contradictory concepts as ‘pure reason’, ‘absolute spirituality’, and ‘knowledge in itself’; these always demand that that we should think of an eye that is absolutely unthinkable, an eye which cannot be allowed to be turned in any particular direction, and in which the active and interpreting forces – through which seeing becomes seeing something – are supposed to be lacking; these always demand of the eye a contradiction and a nonsense. The only seeing which exists is a seeing in perspective, a seeing with perception; and the more feelings we allow to get involved about an issue, the more eyes – different eyes – that we mobilise to observe one thing, the more complete will our concept of this thing, our objectivity, be. Would not eliminating the will … be the same as to castrate the intellect?"
— 3 months ago with 14 notes
"Of course, there is one easy case study that proves the rule: Hawaii, which is separated from every other state by quite a bit of ocean. The Aloha State, which boasts the lowest gun ownership rate and among the strongest gun laws in our country, has the lowest gun violence rate, according to The Law Center To Prevent Gun Violence. Meanwhile, in Arizona, with those ridiculously nonexistent gun laws, you’re five times more likely to die from a gun than in Hawaii. This pattern extends throughout the country, from lax regulation states like Mississippi and Alaska (18.3 and 17.6 gun deaths, per 100,000 people, respectively) to strong regulation states like Rhode Island and Massachusetts (3.5 and 3.6 gun deaths per 100,000, respectively). This really isn’t that hard."
— 3 months ago with 587 notes
ilovecharts:

US Population By County 1790-2010

ilovecharts:

US Population By County 1790-2010

(Source: ispol.com)

— 3 months ago with 812 notes
"Here is how the internship scam works. It’s not about a “skills” gap. It’s about a morality gap.

1) Make higher education worthless by redefining “skill” as a specific corporate contribution. Tell young people they have no skills.

2) With “skill” irrelevant, require experience. Make internship sole path to experience. Make internships unpaid, locking out all but rich.

3) End on the job training for entry level jobs. Educated told skills are irrelevant. Uneducated told they have no way to obtain skills.

4) As wealthy progress on professional career path, middle and lower class youth take service jobs to pay off massive educational debt.

5) Make these part-time jobs not “count” on resume. Hire on prestige, not skill or education. Punish those who need to work to survive.

6) Punish young people who never found any kind of work the hardest. Make them untouchables — unhireable.

7) Tell wealthy people they are “privileged” to be working 40 hrs/week for free. Don’t tell them what kind of “privileged” it is.

8) Make status quo commentary written by unpaid interns or people hiring unpaid interns. They will tell you it’s your fault.

9) Young people, it is not your fault. Speak out. Fight back. Bankrupt the prestige economy."

The moral bankruptcy of the internship economy | Sarah Kendzior (via brutereason)

solarbird added: see also the intrinsic fraud of the prestigious internship. (via solarbird)

this comes from the top rope.

(via bainard)

Also don’t forget that the US Government trades on this by offering so-called prestigious internships in the White House and Congress that are unpaid.

(via inaneenglish)

(via wallflower02)

— 3 months ago with 48148 notes
policymic:

See all those green states? That’s where a majority support marijuana legalization

If it feels like the country is inching toward legalizing pot nationwide, there’s good reason. With every passing day, a new marijuana decriminalization or legalization bill is introduced in the U.S., with both high-profile national politicians and state lawmakers coming out in favor. Public opinion is also increasingly behind the move, as recent polling indicates that around 58% of Americans support pot legalization.
Read more | Follow policymic

policymic:

See all those green states? That’s where a majority support marijuana legalization

If it feels like the country is inching toward legalizing pot nationwide, there’s good reason. With every passing day, a new marijuana decriminalization or legalization bill is introduced in the U.S., with both high-profile national politicians and state lawmakers coming out in favor. Public opinion is also increasingly behind the move, as recent polling indicates that around 58% of Americans support pot legalization.

Read more | Follow policymic

(Source: micdotcom, via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

— 3 months ago with 211 notes
newsweek:

Maybe it’s the high price of gas. Or the bougie obsession with healthy living. Or the emerging understanding that sitting in a car for an hour a day is literally killing you right now. Whatever it is, Americans are 60 percent more likely to bike to work than a decade ago, according to new Census figures. About 800,000 workers pedal to the office every day.
That sounds like a lot, compared to, say, the 40,000 people who take a ferry to work (true fact). But it’s a pittance next to the 120 million workers who still prefer the gas pedal of their car. The city most likely to bike? It’s Portland, Oregon.
In fact, the midwest and northwest dominates the top ten, which lacks any city from the northeast or the south.
Interestingly: Workers in Los Angeles are more likely to bike to the office than workers in New York City. In fact, at 0.8 percent, NYCers are as (un)likely to bike to work as Atlanta workers. Since this data was collected across 2008-2012, it misses, but also explains the challenges of, the introduction of Citi Bike to the city.
The Cities Where Americans Bike and Walk to Work - Derek Thompson - The Atlantic

newsweek:

Maybe it’s the high price of gas. Or the bougie obsession with healthy living. Or the emerging understanding that sitting in a car for an hour a day is literally killing you right now. Whatever it is, Americans are 60 percent more likely to bike to work than a decade ago, according to new Census figures. About 800,000 workers pedal to the office every day.

That sounds like a lot, compared to, say, the 40,000 people who take a ferry to work (true fact). But it’s a pittance next to the 120 million workers who still prefer the gas pedal of their car. The city most likely to bike? It’s Portland, Oregon.

In fact, the midwest and northwest dominates the top ten, which lacks any city from the northeast or the south.

Interestingly: Workers in Los Angeles are more likely to bike to the office than workers in New York City. In fact, at 0.8 percent, NYCers are as (un)likely to bike to work as Atlanta workers. Since this data was collected across 2008-2012, it misses, but also explains the challenges of, the introduction of Citi Bike to the city.

The Cities Where Americans Bike and Walk to Work - Derek Thompson - The Atlantic

— 3 months ago with 145 notes
"Spend your life doing strange things with weird people."
— 3 months ago with 207506 notes